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November 2014

"This Man's Brain Recovery Has Baffled Scientists And Provided Hope For Others"

Amazing and wonderful.

Then out of nowhere, a white Chevrolet van hit them at 75mph, an absurd speed for the neighbourhood. Marcy was killed outright and Lewis was so thoroughly broken that the paramedic on the scene took him for dead. The Chevrolet driver, meanwhile, fled the scene, and was never caught. That was the story the Times ran with – the destructive experience of a hit-and-run in a city where everyone drives everywhere.

Twenty years on, that crash continues to reverberate. Only this time, it’s a happier story, one that Lewis has told in a book, Rise and Shine, and before large audiences at numerous public events. It’s the story of his astonishing recovery, and it not only gives hope to sufferers of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but provides proof, in the most dramatic fashion, of the brain’s incredible ability to regenerate and reorganise itself.


"'Republicans have to show they can govern.' No, they don’t. Please stop saying that."

Beautifully on target.

The alternative to “show you can govern” is to keep President Obama from governing. Right?Keep him from accomplishing what he wants to get done in his final two years and then “go to the country,” as Karl Rove used to say, with a simple message: time for a change! This is not only a valid way to proceed, it’s a pretty likely outcome.

Link via Instapundit.


Now with even more Gruber!

Sorry, I just can't help myself.

"This Gruber-gate supercut video is positively enraging".

"Dear Democrats, Don't Even Think about Running from Jonathan Gruber".

"It’s Time For Leftist Gruber Truthers To Give It A Rest".

"Gruber's bad political analysis driven by bad economics".

"Earth in the Grubering".

Hitler finds out about Gruber.

And best of all, Megan McArdle's "GruberGate's Insider Problem".

So let me finish by noting what I actually find disturbing about the whole Gruber episode. It is not that voters aren't particularly well-informed; voters could not possibly be well-informed about all the issues that our government deals with. No one can be, which is why, when people ask me my opinions about foreign policy nowadays, I say, "I don't know. Looks like a hard problem to me."

Nor is it that politicians lie to voters. We reward them for lying, because we want to be told that we can have everything we want, plus a pony, and the only cost will be that some undeserving layabout will get their benefits cut off, or some very rich person we don't like will have to sell the second yacht and pay higher taxes instead. We should not be surprised when they tell us exactly that.  I'm not saying that I approve of this, mind you; I'm just saying that the way to stop it is not to tut-tut at the politicians, but for voters to stop demanding that they give us the pretty moon.

To which the right response is: expose the politicians' lies, embarass and shame the liars, and then elect new ones. Repeat until the costs of lying outweigh the benefits.

More on lying from Kevin D. Williamson:

The lies are everywhere: California teachers go to the mattresses to protect child-molesters while po-facedly insisting that whatever they do, they “do it for the children,” even as their colleagues do it to the children. LAPD promises “To Protect and Serve” even as the officers in its crime-ridden ranks plant evidence in hundreds of cases, as its gang task-force turns into a gang itself, as the traditional game of cops-and-robbers breaks down completely, with police robbing banks. Politics corrupts even our best institutions. “Semperfidelis”? Not at the top. In the upper echelons, “Saepe fidelis” would be more accurate.