"Quantum ‘spookiness’ passes toughest test yet"

Somewhere Big Al is shuddering.

It’s a bad day both for Albert Einstein and for hackers. The most rigorous test of quantum theory ever carried out has confirmed that the ‘spooky action at a distance’ that the German physicist famously hated — in which manipulating one object instantaneously seems to affect another, far away one — is an inherent part of the quantum world.

"A Scientific Look at Bad Science"

"What recent research says about fraud, errors, and other dismaying academic problems."

Related: "Science Isn’t Broken: It’s just a hell of a lot harder than we give it credit for". Includes a very clever simulation exercise, "Hack Your Way to Scientific Glory".

Also related: "Many Psychology Findings Not as Strong as Claimed, Study Says" and "A Deep Dive Into the Blockbuster Study That Called Into Doubt a Lot of Psych Research". (I'll bet you the best drink in the house that these problems currently affect psychology and sociology more than economics.)

And still more, on a related but separate problem: "64 more papers retracted for fake reviews, this time from Springer journals".

"Easy DNA Editing Will Remake the World. Buckle Up."

Wired article that tries, with some success, to explain the CRISPR technique you may well have seen discussed recently.

Start your dreams. And maybe your nightmares.

Related: Steven Pinker argues that bioethicists should "[g]et out of the way" in "The moral imperative for bioethics":

In the other direction, treatments that were decried in their time as paving the road to hell, including vaccination, transfusions, anesthesia, artificial insemination, organ transplants, and in-vitro fertilization, have become unexceptional boons to human well-being.

Biomedical advances will always be incremental and hard-won, and foreseeable harms can be dealt with as they arise. The human body is staggeringly complex, vulnerable to entropy, shaped by evolution for youthful vigor at the expense of longevity, and governed by intricate feedback loops which ensure that any intervention will be compensated for by other parts of the system. Biomedical research will always be closer to Sisyphus than a runaway train — and the last thing we need is a lobby of so-called ethicists helping to push the rock down the hill.