Science

"The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science"

I hope Matt Ridley's life insurance is paid up because this piece will probably make some of the always-right-thinking, consensus-enshrining people very angry.

(But, if he's lucky, maybe they'll completely ignore it, as they sometimes do with careful, modest, well-reasoned arguments against their position.)

I'd agree with the commenter who wrote, "Matt, this must be the best summation of the sceptical position that I have ever read. Well done."

Link via Instapundit.


"Bee-pocalypse Now? Nope."

There's been a recent flurry of attention on colony collapse disorder. Before you panic, I recommend reading this.

But here’s something you probably haven’t heard: There are more honeybee colonies in the United States today than there were when colony collapse disorder began in 2006. In fact, according to data released in March by the Department of Agriculture, U.S. honeybee-colony numbers are now at a 20-year high. And those colonies are producing plenty of honey. U.S. honey production is also at a 10-year high.


"Why the Biotech Boom Is No Bubble"

Personalized medicine sounds awesome.

For the last 100 years, drug development consisted of small-molecule treatments aimed at mass audiences. For some patients it worked, for some it didn't; sometimes we knew why, often we didn't; and gigantic pharmaceutical companies grew rich. And then, at the turn of the last century, we began to understand a bit more about human genetics—what makes us all different. We knew not only how many genes there were but also what many of them did. We still don't know what to do with all this information, but we are getting better. And just now we are beginning to translate what we know about human genetics to make medicine. Personalized medicine. We are learning not only what "works" but also what makes us susceptible to illness by deciphering where genetics may load the gun and the environment pulls the trigger, and then devising personalized therapies.

Related: "The history of medicine will seem blunt and random compared with what's coming next" and "New era in the war on cancer".

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