Life

"Meet Is Murder"

Virginia Heffernan asks a good question:

They’re boring. They’re useless. Everyone hates them. So why can’t we stop having meetings?

The only explanation I've seen that makes sense is that the third assertion is untrue: a lot of people like meetings. Some because they're friendly and extroverted. Some because they like to hear themselves talk. And some because they feel that however bad meetings are they're better than actual work.


"On Marrying the Wrong Person"

An interesting, if not terribly surprising, look at the mistakes people make in selecting someone to marry.

Anyone we could marry would, of course, be a little wrong for us. It is wise to be appropriately pessimistic here. Perfection is not on the cards. Unhappiness is a constant. Nevertheless, one encounters some couples of such primal, grinding mismatch, such deep-seated incompatibility, that one has to conclude that something else is at play beyond the normal disappointments and tensions of every long-term relationship: some people simply shouldn’t be together.

(This paragraph is accompanied by a picture of Charles and Di.)

Also on marriage: 

"5 Ways You Know It's Time to Get Married".

"Just HOW long should you know someone before tying the knot?"

 


"Why Everybody Should Work in Hollywood"

Not for me, but your mileage may vary.

I’m convinced that working in Hollywood is the most effective and efficient way to teach people how to work.

You have to work well under constant pressure. You have to be responsible for more things than anyone should have to be responsible for. And you have to be cunning. I’ve worked in the development and production of major motion pictures and television, then switched over to working in content at an advertising agency, and now work as a creative director at a media company, but in all my travels, the most incredible workers were those who got their start in the film & television biz. When I think about the things that make me good at my job, I can trace them back to what I learned being at the bottom of the food chain in Hollywood and fighting my way up.


"A few minutes with . . . a really smart soccer player"

There may still be hope for the country.

Being a college student is tough enough.

Imagine trying to keep up your grades while starting for the Michigan State women’s soccer team.

Sarah Kovan has done that extremely well.

Kovan, 21, is working on bachelor’s degrees in comparative cultures and politics and in human biology and was recently named a Rhodes Scholar, an achievement so rare, the school says she’s only the 17th at MSU since 1904. The award pays for Kovan to attend graduate school at the University of Oxford in England.