History

"Why Carthage Failed and Rome Succeeded"

The author, a history professor at UVa, decries what he sees as modern political correctness applied to the history of the Roman Republic.

It is a symptom of the deplorable state of intellectual life today that readers of this magazine can guess the lineaments of the story told in Hannibal the instant they read early in its pages that classical Carthage, the city on whose behalf the great captain of the title fought against Rome, was "diverse" and "multicultural."


"A President Felled by an Assassin and 1880’s Medical Care"

Yesterday was the 135th anniversary of President James Garfield's death. You probably know he was assassinated. You might not know that it wasn't the assassin's bullet that killed him, it was his awful 19th century medical care.

Dr. Ira Rutkow, a professor of surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and a medical historian, said: “Garfield had such a nonlethal wound. In today’s world, he would have gone home in a matter or two or three days.”


"Great Stink"

Ah, the good old days.

The Great Stink was an event in central London in July and August 1858 during which the hot weather exacerbated the smell of untreated human waste and industrial effluent that was present on the banks of the River Thames. The problem had been mounting for some years, with an aging and inadequate sewer system that emptied directly into the Thames. . . .

The smell, and people's fears of its possible effects, prompted action from the local and national administrators who had been considering possible solutions for the problem.


"Hillary’s Empty Moralism Is a Reflection of the Greater Progressive Movement"

Another excellent piece by William Voegeli.

So, is Clintonism one body of thought, or two? The Clintons’ rhetorical oeuvre makes clear that the best answer is zero. Again and again, for a quarter century, their every attempt to connect and rationalize individual policy proposals culminates in sour nothings, windy declarations as solemn as they are vacuous.