History

"Photos: Cruising Van Nuys Boulevard In The Summer Of '72"

"Cruise night was every Wednesday on Van Nuys Boulevard from the early 1950s through the 1970s. Gasoline was mighty cheap, new and old cars were surprisingly inexpensive as well. The San Fernando Valley was home to, what seemed like at the time, a million teenagers, and just about all of them spent many a wonderful evening endlessly cruising from one end of Van Nuys Boulevard to the other, and then back again."


"Why Carthage Failed and Rome Succeeded"

The author, a history professor at UVa, decries what he sees as modern political correctness applied to the history of the Roman Republic.

It is a symptom of the deplorable state of intellectual life today that readers of this magazine can guess the lineaments of the story told in Hannibal the instant they read early in its pages that classical Carthage, the city on whose behalf the great captain of the title fought against Rome, was "diverse" and "multicultural."


"A President Felled by an Assassin and 1880’s Medical Care"

Yesterday was the 135th anniversary of President James Garfield's death. You probably know he was assassinated. You might not know that it wasn't the assassin's bullet that killed him, it was his awful 19th century medical care.

Dr. Ira Rutkow, a professor of surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and a medical historian, said: “Garfield had such a nonlethal wound. In today’s world, he would have gone home in a matter or two or three days.”