Business

"Europe accuses Google of antitrust violations and launches a massive investigation into Android"

Sadly, what has been long forecast here--see, for example, "It's coming, I tell ya," and "One more time, for now: Google and antitrust"--has now happened.

(To be clear, I predicted the US antitrust authorities would do it. I underestimated the power of Google's political pull. And it may still yet come.)

Oh and note the main source of the complaint

And most of the people doing the complaining are NOT Europeans — they are other American tech companies (and their lobbyists) whose international businesses have allegedly been screwed over by Google.

This is all too typical of antitrust complaints. The customers don't seem to mind, but the competitors of very successful companies do.

UPDATE: Clyde Wayne Crews, Jr. offers this sharp, concise formulation:

Antitrust is predatory corporate welfare policy. Firms do get large and powerful, but never as large and powerful as governments that collude with rent-seeking firms to forcibly channel customers to the latter.

Antitrust’s goal is to absolve lawyered-up firms of the need to competitively respond to the new market regimes brought into being by the dominant firm; it artificially secures less-competitive firms’ survival by forcibly denying consumers the choices they otherwise would have been free to make.


"How Does the Film Industry Actually Make Money?"

Adam Davidson, New York Times:

The reason a majority of movie studios still turn a profit most years is that they have found ways to, as they say, monetize the ancillary stream by selling pay-TV and overseas rights, creating tie-in video games, amusement-park rides and so forth. And the big hits, rare as they may be, pay for a lot of flops. Still, the profits are not huge. Matthew Lieberman, a director at PricewaterhouseCoopers, expects growth over the coming years to be somewhere around 0.6 percent.


"McDonald’s Is Microsoft: And it’s getting beat by the Google of hamburgers"

"Creative destruction" in action.

The opposite of the “Walmart effect” understanding of how the economy operates, a view more prevalent among people who like or simply understand capitalism, is the “Bill Gates’s nightmare effect.” Back in 1998, when Microsoft was at the height of its power — it had just become the world’s most valuable company — and Gates was at the height of his prestige, he told Charlie Rose that what worried him wasn’t competition from IBM or Apple or Netscape: “I worry about someone in a garage inventing something that I haven’t thought of.” That was in March of 1998; in September, two guys in a garage in Menlo Park incorporated Google. Gates was correct and incorrect at the same time: Microsoft was surprised by Google and also lost ground to Apple, a company that many technology watchers at the end of the 1990s believed was at the end of its days. Microsoft had market power far in excess of what Walmart enjoys, but it got its flabby corporate butt kicked by a couple of kids.