People who believe this must never be allowed to govern us
"A $100 Billion Train: The Future of California or a Boondoggle?"

"Fantasyland"

This is an arresting article: terribly sad and quite hilarious at the same time. The "fantasyland" in question is, not surprisingly, Berkeley CA and the piece is written by a self-identified liberal. Some of the great bits:

There are still hippies, but they have aged and grown despondent, aware that they have been duped by history, which conformed perfectly to the prediction of Karl Marx by turning out to be a farce. The bumper stickers on their Volkswagen buses are peeling. Tie-dye T-shirts stretch over beer bellies. A crucial battle has been lost. . . .

That’s because for the entirety of its turbulent existence, People’s Park has functioned as a homeless encampment, and not one that has exactly embraced the idealism of the Summer of Love. An angry sore on this landscape of golds and greens, People’s Park is Berkeley’s most potent argument against itself. . . .

I did not emerge from Berkeley on the right, the way David Horowitz and many others have. Yet the crisis in liberalism came to seem much more clear than it had in the many years we’d spent in New York, where a collective desperation about the state of the subways has always erased political difference. . . .

The city made no effort to attract tech companies the way neighboring Oakland did. Just as important, city leaders gave in to the pressure of activists who wanted no housing built in the city at all if there was even the remote possibility that that housing would attract someone who hadn’t seen the Grateful Dead in concert a dozen times. . . .

Conservatives, I have been told, fear change, and that may well be true. But you should meet Berkeley’s liberals.

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