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August 28, 2014

"The New Science of Pairing College Roommates"

I'd be surprised, but pleased, if the "science" has improved since I attended. My college's crack housing folks put me--quiet, nerdy--with a hugely unhappy liar and a borderline alcoholic. 

It wasn't fun.

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JKB

===="Education's about putting people in uncomfortable situations so they start to learn about themselves," says NYU housing head Thomas Ellett.====

See as someone who wanted to actually learn, I thought college was to teach you actual difficult ideas and concepts. But somewhere along the line, the universities got this idea that making living conditions into an uncomfortable situation was their job? So do they keep numbers on how many bail out of college because of an intolerable roommate situation?

As more and more of the details of university operation come to light, universities seem less and less valuable to the truly studious now that the knowledge is more easily available through alternative venues. No doubt the colleges will keep the social connecters, jocks and college experiencers, but what happens if they lose those who actually want to learn and have the ability to do that without wasting their time and money on the social engineering? Will the "club" membership aspects still be so alluring after the universities have lost the luster of the place of pinnacle learning?

Larry

"Education's about putting people in uncomfortable situations so they start to learn about themselves,"

This raised my hackles too. I don't want my children to have to deal with a difficult roommate while trying to master course material.

During my sophomore year I had a disgusting suitemate (two rooms that shared a bathroom and phone). He quickly drove out his roommate, leaving me and my roommate to deal with him. Well, I'd say I did learn something from the experience but not something that fuzzy-headed university administrators would have wanted me to learn.

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