"Why Is It Such a Struggle to Reform Our Colleges?"

Good question. George Leef:

Bok’s view, in short, is like that of former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm who declared that higher education “is like jet fuel for the economy.” Pour in the fuel and the economy roars. The trouble is that this view is mistaken.

At no point does Bok mention that the nation already has large numbers of college graduates who are working in jobs that any reasonably smart high school student could learn. Nor does he see that due to the “positional” nature of educational credentials, the more we push “attainment,” the higher the degree level people need to set themselves apart—the credential inflation problem I have often written about. Finally, Bok barely acknowledges that many successful Americans acquired the knowledge they need without completing college, and in many cases never going at all.


"A Dozen Business Lessons from Waffle House"

I don't know about all 12 but it seems hard to argue with this one:

  1. “We’re just a shoebox. These people who’ve come in the past few years and built these Taj Mahals and stuff—they’re not around anymore. If you could line up the restaurants we’ve seen come and go, that’s a long list.” “We serve the basic foods, and the basic foods never change.” Joe Rogers Sr. “Good food that is fast and affordable.”   Tom Forkner.

"Democracy, Deficit, and Debt: Buchanan and Wagner's classic."

"Keynesian economics changed all this by constructing an intellectual justification for viewing the federal budget as a tool for managing the economy rather than a constraint under which politicians operate.  Keynesianism argued that in recessions budget deficits could stimulate aggregate demand and lead to recovery, while in good times surpluses would both prevent excessive growth and pay back the debt.

"This idea, known as “functional finance,” looks good on the blackboard but has a fatal flaw."