"The Supercomputer That Could Map the Human Brain"

 "In an effort to understand, on the finest level, what makes us human, he’s set out to create complete map of the human brain: to chart where every neuron connects to every other neuron. The problem is, the brain has more connections than the Milky Way has stars. Just one millionth of the organ contains more information than all the written works in the Library of Congress. A map of the brain would represent the single largest dataset ever collected about anything in the history of the world."


"Statistics Establish Harvard's Discrimination Against Asian-Americans"

 Paul Mirangoff's comments on the case. He thinks the plaintiffs should be granted their motion for summary judgment.

(For econ fans, the plaintiffs' expert witness is Duke's Peter Arcidiacono and Harvard's expert is David Card. On an important point in dispute--whether to include special admits in the study data--I think Arcidiacono wins hands down.)


"The Supercomputer That Could Map the Human Brain"

"In an effort to understand, on the finest level, what makes us human, he’s set out to create a complete map of the human brain: to chart where every neuron connects to every other neuron. The problem is, the brain has more connections than the Milky Way has stars. Just one millionth of the organ contains more information than all the written works in the Library of Congress. A map of the brain would represent the single largest dataset ever collected about anything in the history of the world."


"Israel Shows What Alliances Are For"

Absolutely spot on.

Never mind that the $3 billion in military aid amounts to a Pentagon subsidy for American arms manufacturers. Never mind also that Israeli military technology and intelligence make an enormous (and largely untold) contribution to American security.

There's a reason to maintain alliances in the cold light of Realpolitik which conservative isolationists refuse to consider: Allies can do things that we want done at much less risk to us and at far lower cost than if we were to do them directly.


"Update on the Biggest Academic Scandal of the Year"

That would be Nancy McLean's attack on James Buchanan. Now Phil Magness has posted a spreadsheet of her errors. Between this and "The Sound of Silence. A Review Essay of Nancy Maclean's Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America" forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Literature, you'd think her reputation as a historian would take a huge, lasting hit.

But since the Left seems to be invested in her story, that remains to be seen.


"Who Cares about Entitlements? Well all will—in about eight years."

Maybe the politicians will be ready in another twenty or fifty years.

Related:

"Analysis of the 2018 Medicare Trustees' Report".

Gross Medicare spending is projected to grow sharply from 3.7 percent of GDP in 2017 to 4.7 percent in 2027 and 5.9 percent by 2040. After that, it will grow more gradually to 6.2 percent by 2090. Spending growth is largely due to growth in the number of beneficiaries and per-capita health care costs.

"Social Security Will Be Insolvent In 16 Years. Maybe Congress Should Do Something About That."

The people responsible for solving this looming crisis—and for mediating what's sure to be a nasty debate over the future of both programs—spent yesterday acting like there is hardly anything more important than a bunch of rich jocks showing appropriate fealty to the president's opinions.

In other words, we are screwed.

"Darn. I may outlive Social Security".

I've got to quick go see my doctor.

For years he's had me on a health maintenance plan with the goal, he says, of keeping me alive until I'm 90.

Now I need him to ease back on the medicine and good living advice. I'm not sure my money will hold out that long.


"The 300 secrets* to high stock returns"

"But are there really 300 separate characteristics associated with higher asset returns, or only a handful of things really driving stock prices? The hundreds of factors that appear in academic research are based on many possible company characteristics, which could, in theory, capture many types of risk. However, Feng, Giglio, and Xiu are skeptical that all these factors are useful."


"Lots of blame for Seattle’s head-tax debacle. Except where it belongs."

Quit yer complaining. In my experience political blunders are rarely reversed so quickly

Related: "Fed Up in Seattle".

Don’t believe the hype that “Amazon killed the Seattle head tax,” the new levy that the city recently passed on businesses to fund an affordable-housing initiative. The truth behind the city council’s stunning reversal—repealing the tax by a 7-2 vote, just four weeks after passing it 9-0—is that Seattle citizens have erupted in frustration against the city’s tax-and-spend political class that has failed to address the homelessness crisis, despite record new revenues.


Drew Hanlen

I was reading "Mo Bamba's growing case as the best player in this draft" and there's this:

Bamba has done everything in his power since his season wrapped in March to make his case for why teams might regret passing on him, with a regimented routine including strength training, physical therapy, boxing, beach workouts, yoga, film study and two skill workouts a day with renowned player development specialist Drew Hanlen in Los Angeles.

So I wondered: how do you become a "renowned player development specialist"? In three seconds the Net gives me "Young workout guru pushes his clients toward the NBA". Which is just a wonderful story. Primarily because it shows, yet again, what is possible with entrepreneurial spirit and hard work. But also because as an old business strategy teacher, I got a kick out of seeing SWOT analysis used to apparently good effect.